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View Full Version : effective miticides besides Avid, Floramite, Forbid



haze
11-11-2011, 02:00 PM
Been using these three for the past two years on my moms. Time to switch it up to say the least.

Thinking about trying Shuttle O but not exactly thrilled on putting up $135 for a pint if there's something better. If any experienced mite assassins could give me some suggestions that would be great.

jn
11-11-2011, 02:12 PM
I hate to say it but sns217 worked well for me also mighty wash

the pope
11-11-2011, 04:27 PM
yea mighty wash, azamax, and organicide - ive seen all 3 of them work despite what all the knowitalls are about to tell you that everything i listed doesnt work for shit because they are so smart and im an idiot

Kitsapgrapeape
11-11-2011, 04:56 PM
i'd just stick with the 3 you got, if you really want to kill shit drop a nuke knaw meen

Kitsapgrapeape
11-11-2011, 04:57 PM
i never tried em krink can't say they suck, but you can't argue that those other 3 he listed are the A-Bombs of the mitacides.

EcotheVeganGro
11-14-2011, 08:36 AM
I sense a real problem! You've been using 3 products that are each essentially "one hit shit" in rotation for 2 yrs. You're application is suspect, however after 2 yrs, you're fucked, they're likely resistant to all of them. Familiarize yourself w/ an Integrated pest Management strategy before you go further.

If you go SNS 217, make your own for 1/4 of the cost. Get indoor (descented) organocide unless your into smelling fish oil.

different mite populations have different resistances and levels, so what works in your garden may not in anothers (evidenced by this very thread as one application of Floramite is all I needed). This I believe is at the root of much of the product effectiveness dispute. That and the fact that so few products act on the eggs thus requiring repeated applications.

When it comes to selecting a miticide to control spider mites or “mites” in the greenhouse or outdoors, there is oftentimes confusion that all miticides are similar in terms of their use patterns and the range of mites that are controlled. However, all miticides are not created equal as they can vary in the target mites on the label, mode of action, mite stages controlled, quickness of kill and longevity. Always read the label for specific information regarding these factors. Understanding the various characteristics of miticides will enhance the prospect of selecting the appropriate product and increasing the effectiveness of an application. This article will examine many of the commercially available miticides labeled for controlling mites in greenhouses.

AvidAvid, manufactured by Syngenta Professional Products, is an insecticide/miticide containing the active ingredient abamectin. The active ingredient, which occurs naturally, is derived from the soil micro-organism, Streptomyces avermitilis. Avid is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, European red mite, carmine spider mite, Southern red mite, spruce spider mite, cyclamen mite, broad mite, and rust and bud mite.
This insecticide/miticide has both contact and translaminar activity. “Translaminar” is a term that refers to insecticides or miticides that can penetrate the leaf tissue and form a reservoir of active ingredients within the leaf, such as the spongy mesophyll and palisade parenchyma cells. Mites, such as the twospotted spider mite (Tetranychus urticae), the mite most commonly encountered both indoors and outdoors, particularly from spring through late fall, feed on the leaves and may ingest enough active ingredient to kill themselves, even after spray residues have dried.
Avid may provide up to 28 days of residual activity. The label rate for all mite species is 4 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Avid is active on the mobile life stages of mites; however, the miticide has no activity on eggs. Although Avid is slow acting, any treated mites are immobilized after exposure. It has a mode of action that affects the gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) dependent chloride ion channels by increasing membrane permeability to chloride ions, thus leading to inhibition of nerve transmission, paralysis and death.

AkariAkari has the active ingredient fenpyroximate, manufactured by SePRO Corp. This miticide has a very general label stating control of spider mites. It is also labeled for control of broad mite, cyclamen mite and eriophyid mites (several species). Akari is a contact and stomach poison, so complete coverage of all plant parts is important during application. Akari does not have translaminar activity. It is active on all mite life stages including eggs. However, it has higher efficacy against the larvae than the other life stages. Akari works quickly, providing rapid knockdown of existing mite populations. In fact, treated mites immediately stop feeding and females fail to lay eggs. This miticide provides up to 21 days of residual activity.
The label rate is 16-24 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Akari has a similar mode of action as pyridaben (Sanmite) and acequinocyl (Shuttle). All three miticides are mitochondria electron transport inhibitors (METIs). However, the site of action is different from that of Shuttle. Still, these miticides should not be used in succession in a rotation program. Akari has a mode of action that involves inhibition of the mitochondria electron transport system at the NADH-coenzyme Q reductase site of Complex I.

FloramiteThis miticide, manufactured by Chemtura Corp., contains the active ingredient bifenazate. It is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, Pacific mite, strawberry mite, European red mite, citrus red mite, clover mite, Southern red mite, spruce spider mite, bamboo mite and Lewis mite. Floramite is not active on broad, rust or flat mite. It has contact activity only, so thorough coverage of all plant parts is essential. It is active on all mite life stages, including eggs.
Floramite works quickly and may provide up to 28 days of residual activity. The label rate is 4-8 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Floramite has a mode of action involving the blockage or closure of GABA-activated chloride channels in the peripheral nervous system.

HexygonHexygon, manufactured by Gowan Co., contains the active ingredient hexythiazox and is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, arborvitae spider mite, European red mite, honey locust spider mite, Pacific spider mite, Southern red mite, spruce spider mite, strawberry mite and Willamette mite. Hexygon is a contact and stomach poison miticide, so thorough coverage of all plant parts is essential. The miticide may provide up to 45 days of residual activity. The label rate is 1-2 oz. per 100 gals. Hexygon is active on mite eggs and the larvae stage. In fact, any eggs deposited by adult females that contact treated surfaces are not viable; however, Hexygon has no direct activity on adult mites. Hexygon has the same mode of action as clofentezine (Ovation), so it is important to avoid using these two miticides in succession in a rotation program. The mode of action of Hexygon involves disrupting the formation of the embryo during development or inhibiting larval maturation. However, the specific mode of action and target site of activity are still not well understood.

JudoThis insectide/miticide, manufactured by OHP Inc., contains the active ingredient spiromesifen. It is formulated as a 480 soluble concentrate (SC) containing 4 lbs. of active ingredient per gallon. Judo is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, Southern red mite, Lewis mite, tumid mite, maple spider mite, spruce spider mite, honeylocust spider mite, euonymus mite, boxwood spider mite, broad mite, cyclamen mite, false spider mite and eriophyid mites (several species).
This miticide is similar to pyridaben (Sanmite) in terms of target pests, with activity on both spider mites and whiteflies. Judo is active on all life stages — even the eggs — of both spider mites and whiteflies. However, Judo is less effective against the adult stage. The label rate is 2-4 fl.oz. per 100 gals. The miticide has translaminar activity providing up to 30 days of residual activity, which is similar to other miticides including hexythiazox (Hexygon), bifenazate (Floramite) and abamectin (Avid).
Judo has a very unique mode of action compared to the other insecticide/miticides currently available. The active ingredient works as a lipid biosynthesis inhibitor. Lipids are a group of compounds made up of carbon and hydrogen, which includes fatty acids, oils and waxes. Lipid molecules are responsible for a number of functions such as cell structure in membranes and sources of energy. As such, Judo blocks the production of lipids, which disrupts cell membrane structural integrity and reduces energy sources.

OvationOvation, manufactured by Scotts Co., contains the active ingredient clofentezine and is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, Pacific spider mite, McDaniel spider mite, European red mite and yellow spider mite. Because Ovation is a contact miticide only, thorough coverage of all plant parts is critical during application. This miticide is active on mite eggs and the immature stages, such as the nymphs and larvae, with no direct activity on adult mites.
Although Ovation is slow acting, it can provide up to 45 days of residual activity. The label rate is 2 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Ovation has the same mode of action as hexythiazox (Hexygon), which means these two miticides should not be used in succession in a rotation program. Ovation has a mode of action that disrupts the formation of the embryo during development or inhibiting larval maturation. However, the specific mode of action and target site of activity are still not well understood.

PylonPylon is an insecticide/miticide containing the active ingredient chlorfenapyr. Pylon, manufactured by OHP Inc., is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, broad mite, cyclamen mite, citrus bud mite and rust mite. This insecticide/miticide has both contact and translaminar activity. Additionally, Pylon works as a stomach poison when ingested. The insecticide/miticide is active on the mobile life stages, including larvae, nymphs and adults. It has no activity on mite eggs.
Pylon may provide up to 28 days of control. The label rate is 2.6-5.2 fl.oz. per 100 gals. The mode of action of Pylon involves uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation, which is a major energy-producing step in cells, by disrupting the H+ gradient, and thus preventing the formation of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP), a high-energy organic phosphate responsible for energy transfer during cellular reactions.

SanmiteThe active ingredient in Sanmite, manufactured by Scotts Co., is pyridaben. Sanmite is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, broad mite, European red mite, Southern red mite and tumid mite. Sanmite is a contact insecticide/miticide only, so thorough coverage of all plant parts is important for effective control. It has activity on all mite life stages, including eggs, nymphs, larvae and adults. Sanmite works quickly on the mobile stages and may provide up to 45 days of residual activity.
The label rate is 4 oz. per 100 gals. Sanmite has a similar mode of action as fenpyroximate (Akari) and acequinocyl (Shuttle). All three are METIs; however, the site of action is different from Shuttle. Still, these miticides should not be used in succession in a rotation program. Sanmite has a mode of action that involves inhibition of the mitochondria electron transport system at the NADH-coenzyme Q reductase site of Complex I.

ShuttleShuttle has the active ingredient acequinocyl. Manufactured by Arysta LifeScience, this miticide is formulated as a 15-percent soluble concentrate (SC). Shuttle is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite and spruce spider mite. The miticide works by contact activity only but is active on all spider mite life stages, including eggs. It kills spider mites quickly and provides up to 28-days of residual activity. The label rate is 6.4 to 12.8 fl.oz. per 100 gals. Shuttle has a mode of action similar to fenpyroximate (Akari) and pyridaben (Sanmite) as all three miticides are METIs. However, whereas both Akari and Sanmite work in blocking electron transfer at Complex I in the mitochondria, Shuttle binds to the Qo center of Complex III in the mitochondria, reducing energy production by preventing synthesis of ATP. Regardless, it is still important to avoid using any one of these three miticides in succession in a rotation program.

TetraSanTetraSan, manufactured by Valent U.S.A. Corp., contains the active ingredient etoxazole, and is actually a growth regulator for mites, inhibiting the molting process. TetraSan is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, citrus red mite, European red mite, Lewis spider mite, Pacific spider mite, Southern red mite and spruce spider mite. This miticide has both contact and translaminar activity providing up to 28 days of control from a single application. The label rate is 8-16 oz. per 100 gals. TetraSan is active on the egg, larvae, and nymphal stages of mites. It generally has minimal activity on adult mites. However, adult female mites that are treated do not produce viable eggs. The mode of action of TetraSan is as a chitin synthesis inhibitor by preventing the formation of chitin, which is an essential component of an insect and mite’s exoskeleton causing the cuticle to become thin and brittle. As a result, mites die while attempting to molt from one life stage to the next.

ProMiteProMite (formally Vendex) is one of the older miticides and contains the active ingredient fenbutatin-oxide. Manufactured by Griffin LLC, this miticide is available in water-soluble packets and is labeled for control of twospotted spider mite, clover mite, oak mite, Southern red mite and spruce spider mite. ProMite is a contact miticide only, so it is important to thoroughly spray all plant parts during application. This miticide is slower acting than most miticides, taking 7-10 days to eventually kill mites. However, it provides up to 30 days of residual activity. The label rate is 8-16 oz. per 100 gals. ProMite is a warm-weather miticide providing better control when the ambient air temperature is above 70° F. ProMite has a mode of action involving the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation at the site of dinitrophenol uncoupling, which disrupts the formation or synthesis of ATP. This is a restricted use miticide (48-hour restricted entry interval).

ConclusionIt is fortunate there are a plethora of miticides available, for both indoor use in greenhouses and outdoor use in nurseries, which have distinctive modes of action. This makes it easier to develop rotation programs based on using different modes of action in order to avoid mite populations developing resistance to currently available miticides. Be sure to read the label carefully prior to mixing any miticide in order to obtain essential information, including which mite stages are controlled, number of applications recommended, frequency of applications, recommended pH of the spray solution and any phytotoxicity issues for particular crops.

Hopefully this helps! And BTW, start dipping your plants when you treat'em, this insures thorough coverage.


Cheers!

MMJGrower
11-14-2011, 10:16 AM
I had awesome success using spinosad on my thrip infestation. It is fully organic omni certified and I only used it twice on a pretty bad infestation and have been pest free for over 3 months now. The reason Im telling you all this is cause the bottle says it works on mites also.

-MG

aintnothin
11-14-2011, 10:45 AM
I myself, up to this point, have not had a BIG problem these little buggers and have only use azamax. But when a thread getts statred on these, I like to read in case I'm ever hit hard. Out on the farm in the green house, the farmer had them so bad, that when I got home, I striped in the garage and hit the shower, damn things scare me.

Sparkey
11-14-2011, 10:48 AM
yea mighty wash, azamax, and organicide - ive seen all 3 of them work despite what all the knowitalls are about to tell you that everything i listed doesnt work for shit because they are so smart and im an idiot

Neem oil and Dr. Bonners. I am also an idiot =p

haze
11-14-2011, 11:44 AM
I sense a real problem! You've been using 3 products that are each essentially "one hit shit" in rotation for 2 yrs. You're application is suspect, however after 2 yrs, you're fucked, they're likely resistant to all of them. Familiarize yourself w/ an Integrated pest Management strategy before you go further.

If you go SNS 217, make your own for 1/4 of the cost. Get indoor (descented) organocide unless your into smelling fish oil.

different mite populations have different resistances and levels, so what works in your garden may not in anothers (evidenced by this very thread as one application of Floramite is all I needed). This I believe is at the root of much of the product effectiveness dispute. That and the fact that so few products act on the eggs thus requiring repeated applications.

When it comes to selecting a miticide to control spider mites or “mites” in the greenhouse or outdoors, there is oftentimes confusion that all miticides are similar in terms of their use patterns and the range of mites that are controlled. However, all miticides are not created equal as they can vary in the target mites on the label, mode of action, mite stages controlled, quickness of kill and longevity. Always read the label for specific information regarding these factors. Understanding the various characteristics of miticides will enhance the prospect of selecting the appropriate product and increasing the effectiveness of an application. This article will examine many of the commercially available miticides labeled for controlling mites in greenhouses.

!
this would be true if I had a large garden and wasn't able to actually kill them all but fortunately they are all still very effective and I'm not that far yet. But I am afraid I might end up breeding some sort of new super mite that I won't be able to get rid of.

thanks for the list of insecticides. I think I'm gonna go with the Shuttle and slowly phase out my current miticides.

Oldskool
11-14-2011, 12:17 PM
Very good info in this thread - particularly post #6 from EcoTheVeganGro. Could you please provide the source for that article?

What is not addressed is the safety for consumption by humans of treated plant material, and most specifically the inhalation of incinerated and unwashed plant material. I would love to see some authoritative links to such information if it exists.

Because of the residual effect of Avid, I have never used it within four weeks of harvest. If I knew it did not pose a problem for smokers, I could use it later in flowering if necessary.

I have also used spinosad with great success on thrips - but with less than satisfactory results on mites. Spinosad (Conserve) is rated as safe to day-of-harvest for fruits and vegetables. But again, you would normally wash fruits and vegetables and pass them through your digestive system. That isn't the same as NOT washing the product and burning and inhaling it into your respiratory system.

Anyone have some definitive knowledge on the safety of burning and inhaling any of these insecticides?

EcotheVeganGro
11-14-2011, 05:32 PM
Very good info in this thread - particularly post #6 from EcoTheVeganGro. Could you please provide the source for that article?

What is not addressed is the safety for consumption by humans of treated plant material, and most specifically the inhalation of incinerated and unwashed plant material. I would love to see some authoritative links to such information if it exists.

Because of the residual effect of Avid, I have never used it within four weeks of harvest. If I knew it did not pose a problem for smokers, I could use it later in flowering if necessary.

I have also used spinosad with great success on thrips - but with less than satisfactory results on mites. Spinosad (Conserve) is rated as safe to day-of-harvest for fruits and vegetables. But again, you would normally wash fruits and vegetables and pass them through your digestive system. That isn't the same as NOT washing the product and burning and inhaling it into your respiratory system.

Anyone have some definitive knowledge on the safety of burning and inhaling any of these insecticides?

http://www.gpnmag.com/Mite-B-Gone-Understanding-Miticides-article8528

You do point out the weakness of this article as I believe it is directed at ornamentals. I go straight to the manufacturer's website where they're required to provide label and msds (material safety data sheets) pdf's to get the tech info on'em. I believe that these toxic chemicals (every one of them) should be used only as a last resort and that good cultural habits prevent infestations almost entirely.

Unfortunately, I don't think "smoking" tests are performed on most chem's as the tobacco industry isn't very forthcoming w/ their results (prolly could find some if you looked) and no one else in the "legal" mkts would suggest that smoking anything is healthy. In any event, I've never seen this information on an msds of any kind, likely because they're aimed at exposure in the workplace or in home application and immediate affects of exposure. I think that you can use the msds as a reasonable guide coupled w/ common sense e.g. petrochemicals are carcenogenic etc. But ultimately you'd need to be a human biologist/pyrologist (or something to that effect) to really hypothesize on the possible health effects of smoking them.

Nonsystemic chemicals can be washed off to an extent and you can rinse cannabis in luke warm water before you dry it w/ no ill effects.

Cheers!

I just remembered that WA has an incinerator down on the Columbia for the burning of stockpiles of leftover chemical warfare materials. Wonder how good that could be for us?

haze
11-15-2011, 10:00 AM
Very good info in this thread - particularly post #6 from EcoTheVeganGro. Could you please provide the source for that article?

What is not addressed is the safety for consumption by humans of treated plant material, and most specifically the inhalation of incinerated and unwashed plant material. I would love to see some authoritative links to such information if it exists.

Because of the residual effect of Avid, I have never used it within four weeks of harvest. If I knew it did not pose a problem for smokers, I could use it later in flowering if necessary.

I have also used spinosad with great success on thrips - but with less than satisfactory results on mites. Spinosad (Conserve) is rated as safe to day-of-harvest for fruits and vegetables. But again, you would normally wash fruits and vegetables and pass them through your digestive system. That isn't the same as NOT washing the product and burning and inhaling it into your respiratory system.

Anyone have some definitive knowledge on the safety of burning and inhaling any of these insecticides?

Here is some info. I probably wouldn't use it past week two as Avid has contributed to the only Marijuana death I am aware of.

http://ec.europa.eu/food/plant/protection/evaluation/existactive/list-abamectin_en.pdf
http://books.google.com/books?id=mXl_MwamjnwC&pg=PA15&lpg=PA15&dq=abamectin+phi&source=bl&ots=F_F1z24rIj&sig=xpwiyvqtnvBq8LlMz403_AGOw4o&hl=en&ei=M6bCTv6kLMiSiQLdv7HKCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CGUQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=abamectin phi&f=false (http://books.google.com/books?id=mXl_MwamjnwC&pg=PA15&lpg=PA15&dq=abamectin+phi&source=bl&ots=F_F1z24rIj&sig=xpwiyvqtnvBq8LlMz403_AGOw4o&hl=en&ei=M6bCTv6kLMiSiQLdv7HKCw&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=9&ved=0CGUQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=abamectin%20phi&f=false)

Oldskool
11-15-2011, 03:37 PM
Avid has contributed to the only Marijuana death I am aware of.



Can you provide more details please?

haze
11-15-2011, 06:30 PM
Not sure where the main article is but


Harmful pesticides may be absorbed by the marijuana plant during cultivation and then enter the human body through administration. Repeated exposure to unknown chemical poisons may build to toxic levels in a user’s system. In one example from Hayward California, a well-known marijuana patient with an unusual immune disease died from repeated exposure to the miticide "Avid".

eWaSt chronic pain
01-14-2012, 08:38 PM
Dr Doom works well. Just be careful not to fog the plants directly. It will fry the leaves if applied directly. I also like using garden safes 3-in-1. But of course Floramite & Forbid are king.

eWaSt chronic pain
01-14-2012, 09:00 PM
I had awesome success using spinosad on my thrip infestation. It is fully organic omni certified and I only used it twice on a pretty bad infestation and have been pest free for over 3 months now. The reason Im telling you all this is cause the bottle says it works on mites also.

-MG
Spinosad doesn't phase mites. Works wonders on thrips, but when it comes to mites it's not the right tool for the job

Emerald City OG
01-14-2012, 11:23 PM
I had awesome success using spinosad on my thrip infestation. It is fully organic omni certified and I only used it twice on a pretty bad infestation and have been pest free for over 3 months now. The reason Im telling you all this is cause the bottle says it works on mites also.

-MG

True, Spinosad stops mites in there tracks. You can watch. It's THE best for thrips.

It also stops fungus gnats mid flight. Water alone doesn't do that.

Organic or not, it's some powerful shit and I'd still use a resp mask etc. Too much used in the open gives you bad heartburn - scary.

For gnats, I like to spray the topsoil every now and then just to fuck with em.

Throw some Dr Bronners in the spray for wetting.

Emerald City OG
01-14-2012, 11:26 PM
Spinosad doesn't phase mites. Works wonders on thrips, but when it comes to mites it's not the right tool for the job

Interesting. I just read your post.

There truly must be very different varieties of mites, because I've definitely watched it stop mites in their tracks. I guess I was one of the lucky ones. Or maybe I use a stronger concentration.

Of course, floromite was the finishing touch for piece of mind.

kdub86
01-15-2012, 06:16 PM
Azamax worked awesome on mites for me, pretty inexpensive compared to some of the stuff out there too.

CANNABEST
01-15-2012, 09:35 PM
anyone use Einstein oil compared to neem oil?

NW_GDP_Rep
01-15-2012, 09:45 PM
yea mighty wash, azamax, and organicide - ive seen all 3 of them work despite what all the knowitalls are about to tell you that everything i listed doesnt work for shit because they are so smart and im an idiot
I don't think you're an idiot. SPRAY EVERY 3 DAYS, NOT 2, NOT 4, EVERY 3 and how do they ever show up? I love azamax, i have even used safer soap spray... IT WORKED! Just because something didn't work for one guy, DOES NOT mean it won't work for you. Besides the various types of mites, there are lots of other factor's that can cause mite infestation not to cease.